Sunflower competition

by Sam Goodfellow
& Kim Brady

Get involved in our sunflower growing competition for students in year 7, 8 and 9. Sow your seeds or pick up a mini sunflower plant from S06.

Keep your pot inside until the weather is warm and your seedlings are big enough to plant outside. These should be planted in the ground or in a large pot by the end of May, so they can grow beautifully in time for the summer.

We will have prizes for the tallest sunflower and largest sunflower head.

To submit an entry, you must provide:

  1. Photo of the full length of the sunflower
  2. Height of the sunflower
  3. Diameter (width) of the sunflower head.

If gardening isn’t your thing – don’t worry!                                                                                                                                                                       You can also get involved by creating a poster/information sheet to explain how seeds germinate. Include a diary with drawings or photos and be in with a chance of winning.

Submit your entries by the 30th September to K.Brady@langton.kent.sch.uk with your details.

Good luck!

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About Sam

Sam is a Biology Teacher at Simon Langton Grammar School for Girls.

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